File:Carbon Derived Solar Change.png

From Global Warming Art

Higher resolution records of recent solar activity derived from beryllium-10 and sunspot records. Note that time axis is reversed relative to the above plot.

A history of long-term variations in solar activity inferred from changes in carbon-14 production in the atmosphere. Periods towards the top of plot correspond the times of high solar activity and expected warmer conditions on Earth. Based of records such as this, a ~200 year quasi-periodicity in solar activity is believed to exist, with modern conditions near a maximum state. Labels indicate the conventional names for periods of varying production of carbon-14.

It is believed that natural forcings, including changes in solar activity, account for a substantial fraction of the warming prior to 1950, but that the effect of solar variability since then has been minor [1]. See: Image:Climate Change Attribution.png


USGS
This image is a work of a United States Geological Survey employee, taken or made during the course of the person's official duties. As a work of the United States Government, the image is in the public domain. For more information, see the USGS copyright policy.


Source: http://pubs.usgs.gov/fs/fs-0095-00/

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current09:15, 24 November 2005Thumbnail for version as of 09:15, 24 November 20051,000×402 (33 KB)Robert A. Rohde (Talk | contribs) (A history of long-term variations in solar activity inferred from changed in w:carbon-14 production in the atmosphere. {{PD-USGov-Interior-USGS}} Source: http://pubs.usgs.gov/fs/fs-0095-00/ {{Wikipedia Image}})

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